Research theme: Prosperity, Welfare and Inequality

S2q

  1. Title / Topic 

Labour market intergenerational integration policies that indirectly strengthen pensions systems

  1. Target public and/or societal partner. 

The target public of the policy interventions to be presented is the working-age people. This group will be divided into 2 categories, those that are in the first half of the working-age period and those who are in the second half of it, with a special focus on mid-lifers. The policy interventions to be presented target these two groups by separated and together as the main objective is to promote intergenerational integration

Multisector collaboration is required to constitute a strong set of societal partners and public-private teamwork. This set requires the involvement of academia and/or research centers. At the same time, it also requires the involvement of the relevant policymakers such as, the national labour ministries, local and international labour agencies, the correspondent departments of international organizations (such as EC, ILO, UN, and OECD), private firms, and organizations that promote inclusiveness and diversity in the labour ground.

  1. Description of the expected output: 

Regarding the expected outcome, we aim to present specific policy interventions based on evidence that directly promote intergenerational integration in the labour markets (understood as the mutual and continuous exchange of knowledge, and sharing of working grounds that enrich and expands individuals, and systems perspectives), their formality, and productivity, and indirectly strengthen the pensions systems. In specific, these interventions are (i) intergenerational training and integration programs, (ii) cross-generational mentoring programs, and (iii) public and or private labour agencies with a focus on mid-lifers. i) and ii) are direct practical downloads from the ideas of Intergenerational Training (IL) and Intergenerational Practice (IP), concepts developed by the European Map of Intergenerational Learning. The implementation of these specific recommendations requires multisector collaboration as they require academic and public-private involvement. First, academic and/or research activities are necessary to design the specifications of these programs. Next, it is crucial to define the length and sustainability plan of the intergenerational human capital involved in the implementation to ensure a proper integration balance. Furthermore, public institutions are needed to promote these programs highlighting their benefits and facilitating their implementation, and private firms and public organizations are required to implement them.  

  1. Summary 

This policy brief aims to propose a set of specific policy recommendations that directly point towards the improvement of intergenerational integration in the labour market, the latter’s formality and productivity, and that indirectly strengthen pension systems. The central and spillovers-generating concept and practice of the set of policy recommendations is the intergenerational integration in the labour markets. Then the target public of the interventions to be proposed is constituted by the working-age people. As mentioned in point 2, this vast group is divided into 2, those who are in the first half of the working-age period, and those who are in the second half of it. A set of 3 policy recommendations targets these groups by separate and together, with a special focus on mid-lifers. These policy interventions are intergenerational training and integration programs, cross-generational mentoring programs, and public and/or private labour agencies that focus on mid-lifers.  The first 2 are practical examples combining the concepts of Intergenerational Training (IL) and Intergenerational Practice (IP), developed by the European Map of Intergenerational Learning. Finally, for their design, implementation, and evaluation stages they will require multisector collaboration, involving research and/or academic activities, and public-private teamwork. This multisector collaboration is required to cover all the activities involved in the different stages of the policy recommendations developments, such as design, diffusion, facilitation, implementation, evaluation, and also to use the mechanisms involved. More specifically, some relevant policymakers are required as societal partners such as, national labour ministries, local and international (public and private) labour agencies, the correspondent departments of international organizations (such as EC, ILO, UN, and OECD), private firms, and organizations that promote inclusiveness and diversity in the labour ground.  A period of 2 months approx. is required to produce this policy brief.

(i) Intergenerational training and integration programs

Recent research done by Kaffenberger and Pritchett (2020) and its following note by Kaffenberger “Coping up with training after and during an external shock, a proposal note” present a modeling of learning trajectories and outcomes in low- and middle-income countries. They presented a calibrated model that provides a way to examine the potential long-term consequences of the current school closures. The concluded that children who lost formal classes for 3 months, could be 1.5 years behind in 7 years. The consecutive note presented some mitigation strategies that could tackle the loss in the children’s formal training. Mitigation strategies: emergency remediation and ongoing adaptation of instruction to children’s learning levels. 

As pandemic hit, parents lost jobs from formal and informal sources and children lost important formal training. Then, a complementary strategy could tackle both losses. What about a generational integrated remediation training program? A program that provides complementary skills such as basic computation tools and that could be delivered to different generations at the same time. Inter-generational training. 

I., Atkinson, M. and Martin, K. (2008).  Intergenerational Practice: A Review of the Literature. LGA Research Report F/SR262. Under-taken for the National Foundation for Education Research. Available at: www.nfer.ac.uk/publications/pdfs/ downloadable/LIGe report.pdf (accessed 24 April 2014).

Sanchez, M., Butts, D. M., Hatton-Yeo, A., Henkin, N. A., Jarrott, S. E., Kaplan, M. S.,et al. (eds) (2007). Intergenerational Programmes: Towards a Society for All Ages. Available at: www.laCaixa.es/ObraSocial (accessed 24 April 2014). 

Granville, G. (2002). A Review of Intergenerational Practice in the UK. Stoke-on-Trent: Beth Johnson Foundation Centre for Intergenerational Practice.

https://www.brookings.edu/blog/education-plus-development/2020/06/15/how-much-learning-may-be-lost-in-the-long-run-from-covid-19-and-how-can-mitigation-strategies-help/

Michelle Kaffenberger and Lant Pritchett, “Failing to Plan? Estimating the Impact of Achieving Schooling Goals on Cohort Learning”. May 2020.

Michelle Kaffenberger, “Coping up with training after and during an external shock, a proposal note, July 2020.

https://elpais.com/elpais/2020/08/04/planeta_futuro/1596529108_149231.html?utm_source=Facebook&ssm=FB_CM#Echobox=1596531318